Steve Job’s abandoned daughter Lisa Brennan-Jobs tells her story in book ‘Small Fry’

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After the DNA test, she wrote that Jobs’ lawyers rushed to close the case. All her mother got was $500 a month to Brennan-Jobs’ mother, Chrisann

The Hush Post| 13:35 pm | 2-min read

Not many people know about Lisa Brennan-Jobs. She is the daughter of Apple founder Steve Jobs. In her recently released book “Small Fry”, she has talked about how Steve Jobs failed miserably at parenting.

In the book, Brennan-Jobs describes how her father vehemently denied paternity of her. He was forced by a local court to take a DNA test to prove he was indeed her father. After the DNA test, she wrote that Jobs’ lawyers rushed to close the case. All her mother got was $500 a month to Brennan-Jobs’ mother, Chrisann. Shockingly for them, four days later Apple went public and Jobs was worth more than $200 million.

She talks of Steves selfish motive in an incident when he took her on a trip to Napa Valley. But later she realised that Jobs had taken her so that she could babysit her half-brother. He told Brennan as a child that she should expect nothing from him.

“My father abandoned us when I was quite young, and didn’t help out financially — certainly not emotionally,” she said in an interview with Boston Public Radio.

“He decided to come back; and that decision, I don’t know how he made it, but he started coming back,” she said.

“He was not only a young man, but I also think in many ways awkward and didn’t know how to be with a child,” she said in the interview.

“Going back and looking at this story that we had together, I thought ‘Oh!’ and he wasn’t good at [parenting], and he kept on kind of failing, and he kept on trying, and we had some really meaningful times together,” she said.

Brennan-Jobs focus in the book is mostly on her relationship with her mother. Brennan felt sorry for her mother who was a struggling adult, and as her child, she was placing a burden on her both financially and socially.

She writes that she silently came to terms with the role she’s unintentionally played in her mother’s unhappiness.

She also describes how despite her father’s lack of interest in her, she would frequently disobey her mother and use her father’s name to make friends at school or impress the clerk at a local art supply store.

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